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Washington State University
Contributing to more just, equitable, and safer communities. Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

A statement in condemnation of police violence, from the faculty of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Washington State University

June 1, 2020

 

In light of the most recent in a heartbreakingly long series of events involving police violence on communities of color, especially black women and men, the Washington State University Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology reaffirms our faculty’s commitment to principles of social justice, including that of anti-racism. As we train the next generations of criminal justice professionals, we are keenly aware of the importance of helping them develop the knowledge and skills that will enable them to be the agents of positive change the field so desperately needs. We dedicate ourselves to addressing issues of systemic racial bias through not only our teaching but also our research, with which we aim to guide reform. We, as a faculty, vow to continue the pursuit and promotion of a more just society through education, research, service.

Welcome

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology has a long rich history. In 1935, the President of then, Washington State College, Dr. Ernest O. Holland, contacted the nation’s first ever FBI Director, J. Edgar Hoover, for guidance in creating a program for the sole purpose of training law enforcement officers (September 18, 1935 Letter, October 3, 1935 Letter- Part 1, and October 3, 1935 Letter- Part 2). In 1943, under Dr. V.A. Leonard, the Department of Police Science was formed. Since then it has expanded beyond training police officers to touch on every aspect of the criminal justice system.

Combining a passion for scholarship with a keen understanding of practical applications, the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers students the opportunity to learn, explore and develop in a substantive and expanding field. The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology is located on three campuses of Washington State University, at Pullman, Spokane, and Vancouver.

The department offers both graduate and undergraduate degrees; students may earn a minor, a bachelor of arts, a master’s degree, or a doctoral degree in criminal justice and criminology. We have degree options to suit today’s students, with our B.A. offered both on campus and online. With groundbreaking research, renowned professors, and students who are making a difference, WSU is an exciting place to pursue your education.

 

Undergraduate

Undergraduates benefit from a policy-focused curriculum that prepares them both for careers and future study, learning from leaders in the field.


Graduate

Graduate students work closely with faculty, pursuing a more comprehensive understanding of the field of criminal justice and developing as scholars and researchers.

Meet our faculty

Department faculty have a wide range of research and teaching interests, and the department is nationally and internationally recognized for its scholarship.

News

  • Cluster hire program addresses racism and social inequality

    Five new WSU faculty positions have been created to help promote equity and diversity across the Washington State University System.

    The new positions are an integral part of the University’s Racism and Social Inequality in the Americas cluster hire program which was initiated by Provost and Executive Vice President and Professor of Anthropology, Elizabeth Chilton to demonstrate WSU’s commitment to inclusive excellence. The program is designed to address the urgent need for faculty specializing in interdisciplinary research topics associated with equity and diversity.

    The following proposals were accepted:

    African Diasporas in the Americas (Department of History)
    Indigenous Knowledge, Data Sovereignty, and Decolonization (Digital … » More …

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  • Student-produced video celebrates Veterans Day

    Faculty, staff and students across the Washington State University system will celebrate Veterans Day a little differently this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the usual in-person gatherings are unable to take place, student veteran Chris Mann produced a special video to honor and thank veterans from each WSU community.

    Mann is a senior majoring in psychology and criminal justice on the Pullman campus who spent eight years on active duty in the Marines fighting in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He is president of WSU’s Student Veterans Committee.

    “Viewers will see the WSU Veterans Memorial, the service flags flying, and hear taps being played,” … » More …

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  • Staff and faculty recognized during Research Week 2020 awards ceremony

    The Office of Research recognized staff and faculty during the virtual Research Week 2020 awards ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 15. The awards were presented by Washington State University Provost Elizabeth Chilton and Geeta Dutta, assistant vice president in the Office of Research Advancement and Partnerships.

    This year’s Research Excellence Awards and Research Week grant competitions winners included:

     

     

     

     

    Travel Grant Competition
    David Makin, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

    Multidisciplinary Grant Competition
    Erica Crespi, School of Biological Sciences

    RA and $10K Competition
    Liane Moreau, Department of Chemistry

    Largest New Individual Grant Award
    Rock Mancini, Department of Chemistry

     

    » More …

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  • Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence

    Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former spouses and partners, according to a recent study by Washington State University criminologist Kathryn DuBois.

    “In criminology, we often have this urban bias. We assume big cities are the worst and paint other places as idyllic,” said DuBois, associate professor at WSU Vancouver. “We tend to think in a continuum from urban to suburban to rural, but for intimate partner violence, it’s actually the suburban areas that are the safest, and small towns that have the highest risk.”

    The National Crime … » More …

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